A bunch of children and adults by the lake in a park practicing mountain climbing
Supporting Information Facts

Department:

City Services

Other Resources:

World Health Organization

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Illinois Department of Public Health

 

#StopZika

#StopZika

#StopZikaZika is serious, but by working together we can #StopZika in Chicago.

The Zika virus spreads to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito, though sexual transmission has occurred. Zika virus can cause serious birth defects in babies born to women who were infected while pregnant. However, not all women infected with Zika during pregnancy have poor pregnancy outcomes.

Though the mosquitos currently infected with Zika are not native to the Chicago area, there are simple steps you can take to better protect yourself both at home and when traveling to parts of the world where Zika virus is more common.

For Travelers:

If you travel to an area with ongoing Zika transmission, the best protection is to avoid getting mosquito bites.

  • When you are outside, always use insect repellant as directed. Consider long sleeves and pants.
  • When inside, use air conditioning or make sure open windows and doors have screens.
  • After you leave an area with Zika transmission, continue to use mosquito bite prevention and insect repellant for at least one week, to help stop the potential spread of Zika.

For pregnant travelers:

  • If you are pregnant, the CDC recommends that you avoid travel to regions where Zika transmission is ongoing.
  • If you or your sexual partner must travel to regions where Zika transmission is ongoing, avoid mosquito bites, use condoms for the remainder of the pregnancy and talk to your healthcare provider.

For travelers thinking about pregnancy:

  • If you or your partner travels to a region where Zika transmission is ongoing, avoid mosquito bites. Delay pregnancy and use condoms every time you have sex for at least eight weeks and up to six months after travel (see general FAQ), depending on symptoms.
  • Talk to your healthcare provider before and after travel for more specific guidance.

To learn more about how you can protect yourself, please download our fact sheets in English and Spanish. You can also visit the CDC’s website.

For Chicago Residents

Though mosquitos native to Chicago do not currently carry the Zika virus, you should protect yourself and your family from all mosquito-borne viruses, including West Nile Virus. There are simple steps you can take during the summer months, when mosquitos are most common.

  • When you are outside, use insect repellant as directed. Consider long sleeves and pants.
  • When inside, use air conditioning or make sure open windows and doors have screens.
  • Remove standing water around your home, where mosquitos like to breed and lay eggs. This includes water that collects in outdoor furniture and toys, tires, birdbaths, near storm drains, and under potted plants.

To learn more about how you can protect yourself, please download our fact sheets in English and Spanish. You can also visit the CDC’s website.

For Healthcare Providers

Doctors and other healthcare providers are encouraged to download our provider FAQ or visit the CDC’s website for providers for the most up to date information. You can also download our #StopZika posters (English and Spanish) for your offices and clinics.

 

 Get the Facts:  Zika 

English

 Zika: Lo que debe saber 

Spanish

English 8.5" x 11   /  8.5" x 14

 

Español 8.5" x 11  / 8.5" x 14

For more information on Zika Virus:

Collection: Zika Virus

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Get the Facts for Providers: Zika 

 Get the Facts for Providers: Zika                            

Chicago Health Alert Network (HAN)

CDC - For Health Care Providers

Zika Testing