Millennium Park Summer Music Series - Whitney | NE-HI

Sunday, August 12, 2018 • FREE Admission • 6:30pm

Millennium Park, Jay Pritzker Pavilion

Millennium Park  >  Millennium Park Summer Music Series  >  Whitney | NE-HI

 Whitney(click on image to enlarge)

 

(schedule of performers is subject to change)

 

Whitney

Whitney make casually melancholic music that combines the wounded drawl of Townes Van Zandt, the rambunctious energy of Jim Ford, the stoned affability of Bobby Charles, the American other worldliness of The Band, and the slack groove of early Pavement. Their debut, Light Upon the Lake, is due in June on Secretly Canadian, and it marks the culmination of a short, but incredibly intense, creative period for the band. To say that Whitney is more than the sum of its parts would be a criminal understatement. Formed from the core of guitarist Max Kakacek and singing drummer Julien Ehrlich, the band itself is something bigger, something visionary, something neither of them could have accomplished alone. The band itself is something bigger, something visionary, something neither of them could have accomplished alone.

Ehrlich had been a member of Unknown Mortal Orchestra, but left to play drums for the Smith Westerns, where he met guitarist Kakacek. That group burned brightly but briefly, disbanding in 2014 and leaving its members adrift. Brief solo careers and side-projects abounded, but nothing clicked. Making everything seem all the more fraught: both of them were going through especially painful breakups almost simultaneously, the kind that inspire a million songs, and they emerged emotionally bruised and lonelier than ever. Whitney was born from a series of laidback early-morning songwriting sessions during one of the harshest winters in Chicago history, after Ehrlich and Kakacek reconnected - first as roommates splitting rent in a small Chicago apartment and later as musical collaborators passing the guitar and the lyrics sheet back and forth. “We approached it as just a fun thing to do. We never wanted to force ourselves to write a song. It just happened very organically. And we were smiling the whole time, even though some of the songs are pretty sad.” The duo wrote frankly about the break-ups they were enduring and the breakdowns they were trying to avoid. Each served as the other’s most brutal critic and most sympathetic confessor, a sounding board for the hard truths that were finding their way into new songs like “No Woman” and “Follow,” a eulogy for Ehrlich’s grandfather.

In exorcising their demons they conjured something else, something much more benign—a third presence, another personality in the music, which they gave the name Whitney. They left it singular to emphasize its isolation and loneliness. Says Kakacek, “We were both writing as this one character, and whenever we were stuck, we’d ask, ‘What would Whitney do in this situation?’ We personified the band name into this person, and that helped a lot. We wrote the record as though one person were playing everything. We purposefully didn’t add a lot of parts and didn’t bother making everything perfect, because the character we had in mind wouldn’t do that.”

www.whitneytheband.com


 

NE-HINE-HI

Emerging from underground venues in Chicago's Northwest side, NE-HI made its name on both its live energy and cleverly wrought guitar anthems. On its second album Offers (Grand Jury), the band takes those basement-forged instincts and refines them, lets its guitars explore new angles, and focuses its songwriting. The result shows there are a wide range of post-punk possibilities yet to be explored.

It all started at Animal Kingdom, a flash-in-the-pan DIY basement in Chicago's Logan Square. There, in the summer of 2013, three friends from college, Jason Balla (guitar/vocals), Mikey Wells (guitar/vocals) and James Weir (bass) linked up with drummer Alex Otake to score a buddy's film and decided to start bashing around together as NE-HI. NE-HI's more ambitious sound and heady arrangements broke away from garage rock's back-to-basic's approach. The band's disparate influences--Wire's post-punk, Springsteen's everyman anthems, along with echoes of dreamy atmospheres of Dave Roback's Rain Parade and the jangly buzz of Kiwi pop legends The Clean--began burning through. The band attracted the attention of Dave Vettraino, who asked NE-HI to record at his Public House Recordings studio for posting on his website. Vettraino would go on to record the band's debut album. The Chicago Tribune's Greg Kot gave the debut the #4 spot in his 2014 year-end list.

Offers is NE-HI finding that rising to the occasion means living up to your own standards, not someone else's. The band entered Chicago's Minbal studio in January 2016 to record ten songs with Vettraino engineering, but scrapped most of the session. To finish the record, NE-HI went back to touring, writing, rewriting and returned to Minbal in March more solid than ever. It recorded most of Offers live at Minbal to capture the energy--only overdubbing vocals.

Offers drones, it captivates with soaring pop, it shimmers with atmosphere, always changing, looking. The album veers from the staccato pop of "Palm of Hand" (which nods to Chicago's Disappears) to the jangly pleasures of "Stay Young." The off-kilter, ultra-catchy "Sisters" refines the carefree feeling of the band's debut--picking up the spirit of New Zealand pop. Title track "Offers" feels like a slight departure, the band pushing its most abstract and unpredictable instincts. On "Prove" the band's post-punk guitars come at blistering tempo, it's the band's most athletic moment yet. While the punchy drawl of "Buried on the Moon" conjures a less sleepy Let's Active.

Offers finds the distant influence of forebears in cerebral guitar pop presented with a familiarity that typifies great FM rock hits. The Midwestern boys (two from Chicago, one from Wisconsin, and one from Minnesota) in NE-HI have a knack for knitting something comfortable and warm from those art school cast-offs and cult favorites. NE-HI's music demands to be lived in. Chances are good that in the case of Offers, regifting will be rare.

www.nehiband.com

 

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Millennium Park
   

Admission is FREE

Millennium Park
201 E. Randolph St.
Michigan Ave. & Columbus Ave.
Chicago, IL 60601


Millennium Park Visitor Information


Parking:

Millennium Garages

Parking Details: Park right below the music! Garage locations are Millennium Park Garage and Millennium Lakeside Garage at 5 S. Columbus Drive, Grant Park North Garage at 25 N. Michigan Ave. and Grant Park South Garage at 325 S. Michigan Ave.

Packages: $35 parking/Millennium Park Garage and Millennium Lakeside Garage (regular rates apply at Grant Park North & Grant Park South Garages)

Purchase Options: Pay at parking location; call 312.616.0600

Website: www.millenniumgarages.com


CTA Transportation

Take CTA to the Millennium Park Summer Music Series, for travel information, visit www.transitchicago.com.

  • From the elevated lines: exit at Washington/Wabash and walk east.
  • From the subway: exit at Lake (Red Line) or Washington (Blue Line) and walk east.
  • Served by buses 3,4,6,J14,20,56,60,124,146,147,151, and 157.

 

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