Industry

Mayor Emanuel's Industrial Corridor Modernization Initiative

UPDATED March 14, 2017

The Department of Planning and Development (DPD) initiated a public process in spring 2016 to refine land use policies for continued growth and private investment in the City’s Industrial Corridor system.

The multi-year process will incorporate community-based goals, market data, infrastructure assessments, financial planning, and other criteria into framework plans that will guide future public and private investments within each unique corridor.

The process and implementation of refinements are being directed by DPD with assistance and input from elected officials, businesses, property owners, local planning agencies, and other stakeholders.

Generally, the goal of the City’s Industrial Corridor Modernization Initiative is to unleash the potential of select industrial areas for advanced manufacturing and technology-oriented jobs while reinforcing traditional industrial activities in other areas; maintain and improve the freight and public transportation systems that serve industrial users in key job centers; support new job growth and local job opportunities, including residents in “at risk” communities; and leverage the unique, physical features of local industrial corridors to improve their viability and foster demand.

The City will address each of the Industrial Corridors listed below, one by one, starting with the North Branch and continuing in 2017 with the corridors in Kinzie and Little Village.

Public engagement summaries, meeting materials, draft documents for review and the final framework will be posted within the links to the right as they become available.

 

Industrial Corridor Map

Current Corridor Plans
North Branch (2016-17)

Industrial Corridor History and Recent Studies

Chicago has implemented plans and policies to concentrate industrial activity in specific areas suited for manufacturing since the 475-acre Stockyards opened in 1865. These areas, usually located along waterways and rail corridors, were formally designated as Industrial Corridors by the Chicago Plan Commission starting in 1992. Their zoning and uses are primarily restricted to industrial or manufacturing activities, and any proposed land use changes require review by the Plan Commission and City Council.

The city's 26 designated Industrial Corridors contain two thirds of all the land that's zoned for manufacturing in Chicago, including 15 Planned Manufacturing Districts that further refine the types and scale of allowed uses.

Chicago's industrial land use policies have not been updated in approximately 25 years. Recent, community-based planning efforts have determined that new policies are needed to respond to changing industrial demands and for Chicago to maintain its historic role as one of the world's most competitive manufacturing centers. These studies, plans and initiatives enable modern land use policy considerations to move forward in support of jobs, business investment and neighborhood growth (see links below).

The goals of the City’s Industrial Corridor modernization efforts are intended to unleash the potential of select industrial areas for advanced manufacturing and technology-oriented jobs while reinforcing industrial activities in other areas; maintain and improve the freight and public transportation systems that serve industrial users in key job centers; support new job growth and local job opportunities, including residents in “at risk” communities; and leverage the unique, physical features of local industrial corridors to improve viability and foster demand.

To kick-off the entire Initiative in April 2016, DPD met with the City’s Local Industrial Retention Initiative (LIRI) agencies, where representatives from each industrial corridor were briefed on the purpose and process for land use refinements involving Chicago’s industrial landscape. LIRI groups will continue to meet with City planning staff on a bi-monthly basis as community meetings are held and City planning staff develop, present, refine, and coordinate the presentation of each framework plan for review by the Chicago Plan Commission.

Ongoing public outreach by DPD will support the development of modern, data-driven, land use plans for each industrial corridor based on their individual characteristics, infrastructure requirements and market strengths.

Industrial Presentations


Studies


Comparable Planning Efforts

Inquiries:

Review process: 312.744.1074

Media: 312.744.9267

Press Release

Comments:

dpd@cityofchicago.org

Other:

Local Industrial Retention Initiative