July 31, 2015

CDPH Announces Record Jump In Chicago Teens Receiving HPV Vaccine

City’s comprehensive outreach efforts lead to coverage levels above the national average
Mayor's Press Office    312.744.3334

The Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) today announced a dramatic increase in the percentage of Chicago teens who have received the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. The HPV vaccine prevents the most common types of the virus, some of which can lead to cancer. The improvement was highlighted in the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) release of the yearly National Immunization Survey-Teen (NIS-Teen).

“CDPH’s vaccination-awareness efforts show how the City of Chicago is dedicated to keeping our young people safe and healthy,” said Mayor Emanuel. “These results demonstrate how adolescents are taking action now so they can be more in control of their health tomorrow.”

In 2014, coverage levels for Chicago females having received the first dose of the HPV vaccine increased to 78.1 percent, up from 57.6 percent in 2013. The 2014 average for the United States was 60 percent. Coverage levels for the same group having received all three doses of the vaccine increased to 52.6 percent, up from just 36.5 percent in 2013. The 2014 average for the United States was 39.7 percent.

In 2014, coverage levels for Chicago males having received the first dose of the HPV vaccine increased to 64.9 percent, up from 45.8 percent in 2013. The 2014 average for the United States was 41.7 percent. Coverage levels for the same group having received all three doses of the vaccine increased to 26.1 percent, up from 18.5 percent in 2013. The 2014 average for the United States was 21.6 percent.

“The NIS- Teen data show that our efforts to protect teens from cancer are resulting in more teens getting vaccinated,” said CDPH Commissioner Dr. Julia Morita. “Nonetheless, there is still work to do if we are going to reach our 2020 goal of 80 percent coverage.”

In January 2014, CDPH announced a new plan to improve vaccine acceptance and to decrease cancer rates throughout the City. The plan included in-person training for medical providers and a citywide public education campaign geared toward adolescents and their parents. The plan was made possible through an $829,654 grant awarded to CDPH CDC following a competitive bidding process.

Throughout the year, CDPH hosted 22 educational events (webinars and in-person meetings) with over 2,000 participants from the healthcare field. In June 2014, CDPH launched a citywide public awareness campaign. The campaign featured ads on buses, trains, broadcast and digital media that encouraged parents to talk to their child’s doctor about getting the HPV vaccine. Another important strategy included in-office education sessions by physician and nurse practitioner educators in clinics throughout Chicago. In these sessions, clinic staff received “report cards” that summarized how well they were vaccinating their teenagers and received suggestions for improving their patients’ acceptance of HPV vaccine.

“Chicago’s efforts to protect its youth from dangerous cancers have made for a great success story,” said Dr. Anne Schuchat, Director of CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. “CDPH has established itself as a national leader in public health community outreach practices that make the City a healthier place.”

The HPV vaccine is recommended for all girls and boys ages 11 to 12 and is given as a series of three shots over six months. To get your child vaccinated, talk to your healthcare provider. If you do not have a healthcare provider, call 311 for more information about the HPV vaccine or to locate one of our Fast Track Immunization Clinics that provide all routinely recommended vaccines to children ages 0-18 years.

CDPH worked with the following community partners on the HPV vaccination plan: Access Community Health Network, Alliance of Chicago Community Health Centers, American Academy of Pediatrics (IL Chapter), American Cancer Society, Inc., Blue Cross Blue Shield of IL, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Chicago Public Schools, Erie Family Health Center-School Based Health, EverThrive Illinois, Foundation for Women's Cancer, IL Academy of Family Physicians, IL Dept. of Public Health, Loyola University-Proviso East School Based Health Center, Planned Parenthood of Illinois, Respiratory Health Association, Rush University Medical Center, University of Chicago Medicine – Health4Chicago, Comprehensive Cancer Center/Sisters Working It Out, UIC- Internal Medicine and Pediatrics/Office of Community Engagement and Neighborhood Health Partnerships.

 

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